People

Bataan survivor finds mercy

CODY – Just before the Japanese began bombing Clark Field in the Philippines, shortly after the attack on Pearl Harbor, Leonard Robinson and two of his friends were off getting lunch for the others in his platoon.

Robinson got separated and missed his ride back, but the truck carrying his friends was struck by two bombs, and both men were killed.

“I figured that, by the grace of God, there’s usually a survivor to everything, and I will be that survivor,” Robinson said Friday.

Aug. 14, 2009: Bataan survivor finds mercy

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Entrepreneur’s story too good to be true

GREYBULL, Wyo. – The vision Dan Madson pitched to the people of Greybull seemed like an answer to their prayers.

He proposed building a steel processing plant, Kardan Steel, that would employ 250 people in high-paying positions with good benefits. It seemed like a perfect fit for an area sorely lacking such jobs.

The whole idea sounded almost too good to be true.

Turns out it was.

March 4, 2006: Entrepreneur’s story too good to be true

ALSO:
Jan. 7, 2008: What ever happened to? Man behind steel hoax apologizes

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Tough as nails, but gentle as a lamb

CODY – In Wyoming, there are a few occupations in the great outdoors – rancher, oil field worker, backcountry ranger – that seem to define what life in the Cowboy State is all about. Burns Biggs has done them all.

Biggs also spent several years in the U.S. Army, fighting in World War II and the Korean War.

And though he retired in 1996 from the U.S. Forest Service, Biggs, 87, still gets calls from hikers, outfitters and hunters looking to tap his encyclopedic knowledge of Park County’s wilderness.

“I can tell you about any place you want to travel on the North Fork, South Fork or the Thorofare,” said Biggs, who supervised backcountry work crews and patrolled the forest.

May 24, 2008: Tough as nails, but gentle as a lamb

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‘Rain man’ inspiration works to promote understanding

CODY – Kim Peek can tell you when you’ll retire, but he’s not an investment adviser. He can tell you the names of every pitcher in the 1959 World Series, but he’s not a sportscaster. He can tell you the ZIP code of any town in America, but he’s not a postmaster.

Peek is just amazingly different from anyone you’ll ever meet.

“You don’t have to be handicapped to be different,” Peek said Wednesday at the Buffalo Bill Historical Center in Cody. “Everybody’s different.”

Dec. 14, 2006: ‘Rain man’ inspiration works to promote understanding

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Former ranger recollects Yellowstone as seen from a horse’s back

CODY – It has been almost 50 years since Bob Richard worked as a ranger in Yellowstone National Park, but his love of the high country and its wildlife remains constant.

“I call Yellowstone my backyard. I’m always concerned with what’s happening there. Each spring I go back and look at the changes to the hot springs and thermal areas,” said Richard, who now works as a tour guide, author and photographer.

Feb. 21, 2009: Former ranger recollects Yellowstone as seen from a horse’s back

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Cody’s class of ’49 still holding reunions

CODY, Wyo. – High school graduates from the Class of 2009 can get back in touch with each other through social-networking Web sites like Facebook, sharing thoughts and sending messages with just a few quick keystrokes.

But many of the 49 students from Cody High’s graduating class of 1949 have never lost touch, getting together for reunions every five years, including a 60th anniversary gathering this week in Cody.

June 30, 2009: Cody’s class of ’49 still holding reunions

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Photographer sees history in making

POWELL — Photographers strive to freeze a moment in time, showing others an image they might not otherwise notice or appreciate.

But Northwest College student Lindsay Linton said she ended up expanding her own perspective of her hometown with her latest project, “Been Here for Generations,” a collection of environmental portraits on display at the Homesteader Museum.

April 30, 2010: Photographer sees history in making

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